Come and travel Oklahoma with me.

Posts tagged ‘Oklahoma Route 66’

Food Friday: The Butcher BBQ Stand

A few weeks ago we had a nice weekend, so we went east on old Route 66. After a quick drive through Wellston, we found The Butcher BBQ Stand where 66B joins Route 66 on the east side of town. I had read about them online and knew if you weren’t in line early, you might not get any food. It was already after noon but we decided to stop anyway.

There was no line outside, so I thought that was a good sign until we got inside and saw the line that went around the dining area. Since we had come that far we decided to stay and see how long it would take. Now to be honest, the line did move pretty well but it still took us 30 minutes before we got to the front to order. Fortunately, they still had quite a bit of food still available, Big K got the rednexican nachos and I got a 2-meat plate with sausage and burnt ends. Before we even got to a table, our dinner was ready. I was surprised by the amount of food on the plate, there was a lot. Not just the 2 meats but sides of potato salad and mac and cheese as well as a huge piece of Texas toast. I jumped right in with the sausage, it had a smoky flavor, quite good. Now the burnt ends were great, melted in my mouth. Perfect combination of fat and meat, and crisp but tender. These were true meat candy and I highly recommend them. The potato salad was good as well but the homemade mac and cheese really stood out. Spiral pasta in a rich cheese sauce that had a sharpness to it that gave it a bit of a kick. Now the rednexican nachos that Big K got were the same way, lots of food piled on a tray. He got his nachos piled high with pulled pork, with creamy queso and barbecue sauce over top. He thought they were some of the best nachos he had ever eaten. Very flavorful with the different combination of food.

So I will highly recommend a drive up old Route 66 to Wellston for The Butcher BBQ Stand. It’s even worth the wait to stand in line. This was easily the best barbeque I’ve had in Oklahoma in a while. The service was great, very friendly employees. I will give the 5 strips of bacon with some of those burnt ends.

Coffee Corner: 918 Coffee

During a recent trip to Tulsa, we decided that we wanted to try something different for breakfast. It was this desire for difference that led us to 918 Coffee. I ordered a ham and cheddar bagel sandwich and a hot Heath Bar Latte. The bagel sandwich was perfectly toasted and provided the morning fuel that I needed for the rest of our trip. The latte was warm and satisfying, and the baristas even took the time to create a latte art leaf on the top. It was called a Heath Bar Latte as it tasted like a Heath Bar. I highly recommend 918 Coffee to anyone in the Tulsa area. Written by Mae.

From the backseat Mae suggested this place and her dad was a second on this, so I turned the Jeep around and we stopped. Located in an old service station right along Historic Route 66, I was pleasantly surprised. You can go in either the older section or through what was once huge garage doors. Up to the counter where the young ladies working there were super friendly. We all got bagel sandwiches with ham and cheddar. Miss Mae got the latte while me and Big K wanted something cooler. We both went with frappes, I had a peppermint patty and he had a Reese’s peanut butter. They were really good, mine was cool and minty, perfect for the hot day ahead. The sandwiches were also really good, toasted. The atmosphere was great for automobile history fans like us (Big K is also a mechanic so he loves this stuff), sitting in the old bays of the shop. They also had nice automobilia with signs and an old tool cabinet. The entrance was built in 1928, with the shop part built in 1946. It became a coffee shop in 2013. Just really cool to sit on Route 66 and eat in a former gas station and auto shop. I will go back the next time I’m in Tulsa. 5 strips of bacon.

Address: 2446 E. 11th St., Tulsa.

Oklahoma Route 66 Museum

On a crisp Saturday morning we decided to take off and road trip out old Route 66. This is always a beautiful drive, heading out west from Yukon, past the small town of Banner, into El Reno. From there keep going out west, past the farms and valleys, listening to the rhythmic thumping of the original Portland concrete. I love going down the Bridgeport hill, with the South Canadian River valley spread out in front of you as you glide down the incline. There is a small piece of original pavement where it swept to the left to go across the Pony Bridge. Past the crumbling Hinton Junction, with a quick stop at Lucille’s Provine Service Station, through Weatherford, then into Clinton. Lots to see on the way here but I am here to talk exclusively about the Oklahoma Route 66 Museum.

Opened in Sept 1995, this is a nice stop to learn about the history of Route 66 though the state of Oklahoma. Through the black double doors, the first stop is the building of the highway. Not just pictures but the actual tools used are on display. Smudge pots and surveyors tools that show how rough the building of the highway was back in 1926. The next display is of a service station. These were vital along the route back in its heyday. So many cars would fail along the trip, the service stations were a life line for those who had car trouble. Another display shows bus lines and freight transit along the route. Then into a replica diner, just like today, you needed to have a place with good food to sit and relax. Next up is a hippie painted VW Bus, to show how the route was used by their free spirits. Then onto the decertification of Route 66 and its resurgence over the past 25 years.

This is a really cool place to visit. Takes about an hour to go through but you learn a lot about the history of Route 66 through Oklahoma. I love seeing the pictures of what the road looked like not only during the building of the highway but of the years following. The museum also has plenty of static displays inside and out of life as it was on the old route. Of course the heyday of Route 66 was from the 1930’s to the late 1950’s. As the road was bypassed by Interstates 44 and 40 in Oklahoma, many sections of the old highway were left abandoned. Oklahoma does still have over 400 miles of Route 66 still drivable and I’ll talk about that some other time.

The Oklahoma Route 66 museum is a nice stop to get out of the car, stretch your legs, and learn about the old road as it meanders through the state.

Address: 2229 W Gary Blvd., Clinton.

Reproduction of an old gas station on Route 66
Reproduction of an old Ford used to take Oklahomans to California in the 1930’s
Old VW Bus
Diner moved to the museum site

Tag Cloud